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History

The Fate of Richard III

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Bonus facts Everyone knew England’s King Richard III was killed around the Battle of Bosworth Field in 1485, but no one was entirely sure what kind of fate he met. Some suggested he was killed on the field of battle, while others claim he was captured and executed afterwards. Without any remains, it was impossible…

According to Herodotus’s The Histories, a woman, Artemisia, served as one of Xerxes naval commanders during the Persian Wars including at the Battle of Salamis

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According to Herodotus’s The Histories, a woman, Artemisia, served as one of Xerxes naval commanders during the Persian Wars including at the Battle of Salamis. Herodotus reports that Artemisia “sailed in command of the men of Helicarnassus, Cos, Nisyra and Calydia and furnished five ships of war…not one of the confederate commanders gave Xerxes sounder…

It is claimed that during the battle of Stalingrad, more German soldiers died trying to unsuccessfully capture this one building from the twenty-five Soviet soldiers and ten civilians defending it than died the entire invasion of Paris

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It is claimed that during the battle of Stalingrad, more German soldiers died trying to unsuccessfully capture this one building from the twenty-five Soviet soldiers and ten civilians defending it than died the entire invasion of Paris.

During the Holocaust, Jewish boxer Salamo Arouch was imprisoned at Auschwitz. He was forced to fight fellow prisoners; the losers were sent to the gas chambers or shot. He survived over 2 years and 200 fights until the camp was liberated

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During the Holocaust, Jewish boxer Salamo Arouch was imprisoned at Auschwitz. He was forced to fight fellow prisoners; the losers were sent to the gas chambers or shot. He survived over 2 years and 200 fights until the camp was liberated.

The iconic photo, taken February 23, 1945, by Associated Press photographer Joe Rosenthal wasn’t the first flag raised over Iwo Jima that day, and Rosenthal was’t the only one there taking photos.

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Some say it’s the most famous, perfectly composed news photo of all time. The iconic photo, taken February 23, 1945, by Associated Press photographer Joe Rosenthal wasn’t the first flag raised over Iwo Jima that day, and Rosenthal was’t the only one there taking photos. Marine Sgt. Louis Lowery, a photographer for Leatherneck magazine, captured…

The shortest war in history was fought between Zanzibar and England in 1896. The war lasted only 38 minutes before Zanzibar surrendered

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The shortest war in history was fought between Zanzibar and England in 1896. The war lasted only 38 minutes before Zanzibar surrendered. The war, lasting less than three quarters of an hour, is considered the shortest in recorded history. Several durations are given by sources, including 38, 40 and 45 minutes, but the 38-minute duration…

Christopher Columbus consulted an astrologer named Pierre D’ailly about the journey which eventually led to his ‘discovery’ of America

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Christopher Columbus consulted an astrologer named Pierre D’Ailly about the journey which eventually led to his ‘discovery’ of America. D’Ailly told Columbus that Saturn and Jupiter were going to be conduct during this time and that this conjunction usually meant that some big historical event was going to happen.

Nearly iconic portrait of U.S. President Abraham Lincoln is a composite of Lincoln’s head and the Southern politician John Calhoun’s body.

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The standing portrait of Lincoln was created soon after the American Civil War. Although it hung in many classrooms, Lincoln never posed for it. Instead, an unknown entrepreneur created it by cutting-and-pasting a headshot of Lincoln taken from a photograph by Mathew Brady onto a portrait of the Southern leader John Calhoun. This was done…

Charles Becker a Lieutenant in the New York City Police Department was the first being tried, convicted and executed for the murder of a Manhattan gambler, Herman Rosenthal became the first American police officer to receive the death penalty for murder

1911 --- Original caption: New York: New York Police lieutenant Charles Becker (shown in 1911), was the king of graft in Manhattan, ruthlessly ordering death for anyone, such as gambler Herman Rosenthal, who displeased him. --- Image by © Bettmann/CORBIS

Charles Becker (July 26, 1870 – July 30, 1915) was a Lieutenant in the New York City Police Department between the 1890s and 1910s. He is best known for being tried, convicted and executed for the murder of a Manhattan gambler, Herman Rosenthal. After the Becker-Rosenthal trial, Charles Becker became the first American police officer…

1903 – The William West – Will West case at a federal prison in Leavenworth, Kansas, changed the way that people were classified and identified

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Bonus facts These two men look nearly identical, they had the same name, and they were sent to the same prison. Before imprisonment, they had never met. They are the reason why fingerprints are now used to identify people. 1903 – The William West – Will West Case at a Federal Prison in Leavenworth, Kansas, changed…

President Roosevelt used Al Capone’s Limousine

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A little bit of history On the day of the attack on Pearl Harbor, the Secret Service realized they did not have a bulletproof car to transport President Roosevelt safely to Congress to deliver his Infamy Speech. There was one slight problem. US government rules at the time restricted the purchase of any vehicle that…